SharePoint Holmes and the Online Only

sh-onlineonlyThe case

“ I can not open the embedded document” the user told me.
“Ah”, I thought, “I have once solved a case for that”.
“Please ask the site owner to make sure the library opens in the client application” I told the user. “Because embedded documents do not open in the online version“.
I thought that was the end of it, but some time later the site owner contacted me, telling me that the document library always opened in client so he did not understand what I meant.
To be honest, I did not understand it either anymore, so I needed to put on my sleuthing hat.

The investigation

  1. I checked the library and the settings. Yes, the library was set to open in the client.
  2. I selected the document and opened it with Word. No problem.
  3. I asked the user which version of Word he had. A recent client version.
  4. Then I checked his permissions to the site. Somehow or other I always end up checking permissions. The user had Read permissions, as expected.

    sh-onlineonly-sitesettings
    The user was in the Visitors group with Read permissions to the site (In Dutch it is “Lezen”)
  5. I looked at the items with different permissions and noticed that the document library had different permissions from the site. There I saw that the user had been added with View Only, which according to the description means: View pages, items, and documents. Any document that has a server-side file handler can be viewed in the browser but not downloaded. File types that do not have a server-side file handler (cannot be opened in the browser), such as video files, .pdf files, and .png files, can still be downloaded. 

    sh-onlineonly-librarypermissions
    In the Document Library this group has “View Only” permissions.

6.  I gave my colleague the same permissions to the site and checked what happened. Indeed, she could only open documents in the online version with that role.

sh-onlineonly-opening
The user could only open documents in Word Online. No option to use Word Client.

The solution

The site owner had inherited the site and did not know why this permissions set had been given. To be honest, I have never used it so I wonder what people use it for.
I explained the situation and told him that the determining factor was the need to see the embedded document.

  1. If the user had no need for the embedded document, he could leave the permissions as they were.
  2. If the user needed to see the embedded document, he still had two choices:
    – Make the document available in the document library, instead of embedding it, and leave the permissions as they were
    – Give the user Read permissions

Tips:

  • Be aware that people with View Only can also not Copy or Move.

    sh-onlineonly-nocopyormove
    There are no Copy To or Move To options when you have View Only
  • @Site Owners: stick to the standard roles as much as possible
  • @Site Owners: always ask your predecessor for the why if you see any strange things when the old site owner hands over the site to you. (Yes, I know this will not happen, but a support girl can dream 🙂 )
  • @Support people: You will have noticed by now that you should always check
    – Client/Online opening behaviour
    – Classic/Modern settings (they are not an issue here, but have been unexpected causes of issues in other cases)
    – AND permissions


About SharePoint Holmes:
Part of my role is solving user issues. Sometimes they are so common that I have a standard response, but sometimes I need to do some sleuthing to understand and solve it.
As many of my readers are in a similar position, I thought I’d introduce SharePoint Holmes, SharePoint investigator, who will go through a few cases while working out loud.

Image courtesy of OpenClipart-Vectors on Pixabay.

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SharePoint Holmes and the Invisible Image

SH-invisible-man-154567_1280The case

“It is possible to show the person’s picture in a list, next to the name?”  the user asked me. “Of course”, I said, but it depends on the list and the definition of the column. Let’s have a look.”

The user did a screenshare with me and showed me the list. It contained a number of “People or Group” columns.

We checked the settings of the columns and it turned out he had used the default option, “Name (with presence)”.

SH-InvisibleImage-Default
The default option when you create a “Group or Person” column.

So I showed him there were more options and that he’d better select “Name (with picture and details)”.

SH-InvisibleImage-Namepicdetails
I suggested this option to make the picture show in the list

So he did, and he went back to the list. But no image was shown.

SH-InvisibleImage-ListModern
No image next to the name 😦

The investigation

  1. I checked the column again, as this was unexpected behaviour. Yes, that was the right setting.
  2. I also tried the other options, “Picture only” in various formats. But the image would not show.
  3. I was flabbergasted. Microsoft Office, especially in the Modern fashion, has such an obsession about pictures, images, icons and other visuals that I could not understand why the picture would not show up. I mean, I have to look at myself all day but SharePoint would refuse this?
  4. But then I thought, what about Classic View?

The solution

I switched to Classic View and there it was:

SH-InvisibleImage-Listclassic
This was what the user was looking for!

The user was happy and changed the Advanced Settings to make sure this list would always open in Classic View for all the site’s users.

I am not so happy, however. This was a modern site with a modern list and a perfectly legit column setting. Why is the picture not displayed in the Modern View, knowing the emphasis Microsoft places on visuals?
Please note it is the same with Styles and Totals – they only display in Classic View 😦
I have already added a warning to my SharePoint Style Counsel blog…

Additionally, over time I have grown an aversion to the Classic view as I think it looks cluttered.

So, does anyone know when can we expect these display options to be available in the Modern view?

About SharePoint Holmes:
Part of my role is solving user issues. Sometimes they are so common that I have a standard response, but sometimes I need to do some sleuthing to understand and solve it.
As many of my readers are in a similar position, I thought I’d introduce SharePoint Holmes, SharePoint investigator, who will go through a few cases while working out loud.

Image courtesy of OpenClipArtVectors on Pixabay

SharePoint Holmes and the Gone Gallery

800px-Northwestern_High_School_Student_Art_GalleryWhile all consultants are writing about Modern Sites, Hub Sites and Communication sites, I am quite certain that a lot of us practitioners are still working with the Classic sites. Looking at “my own” environment this will not change overnight.

(One of the joys of being a practitioner is that you can watch an intranet grow old…and not always gracefully 🙂 )

So here’s another case of Classic SharePoint Investigation.

The case

“I can only add app parts to the page,” the user said. “I am the owner of the site and I would like to add Summary Links, but I can only see the web parts for the document libraries and lists in my site.”

And indeed, when I looked at her page in Edit mode, it looked like this:

SH-GG-WebParts
Although the user had selected the Web Part Gallery, she only saw the App Parts.

 

SH-GG-AppParts
This is what she saw when she selected the App Parts – exactly the same!

 

The investigation

  1. The site permissions were OK – she indeed had the correct permissions to manage the site.
  2. I checked the permissions for the Pages library and Pages – all were inheriting from the parent so that was not the issue.
  3. I logged in as admin (that account has Administrator permissions on all site collections in the tenant) and I saw all web parts. So it looked like another permissions issue.

    SH-GG-CorrectWP
    Same page, different user: I could see the web parts
  4. I asked the owner to which business she belonged. That was Business B. This gave me the clue that I needed.
  5. I checked the site collection – this was a site collection for Business A.
  6. So I checked her permissions on the site collection level – none, as only employees of Business A had access.
  7. To confirm, I checked her permissions for the Web Part Gallery.  Bingo!

The solution

As we are divesting Business B, we have removed all permissions of the Business B people from all site collections of Business A, and vice versa. This means that the Galleries in the Business A site collections are not accessible to employees of Business B. It is an exceptional case that a Business B owner is an owner of a Business A site, but there was a reason for that.

Fortunately the Web Part Gallery had unique permissions, so I added her to the Gallery and then she could do what she needed to do. I did not have to worry about maintenance as her account will be removed in a few months automatically as the system separation takes place. (I may write about that later.)
Frankly, I do not know which permissions a Web Part Gallery should have by default, as I have seen both “inherited” and “unique” while checking some site collections.

This case is probably not very common, but if you ever get incidents where people can not see the web parts when editing a page, please check permissions of the Web Part Gallery at the site collection level. I remember once accidentally removing all permissions at site collection level, and after I had added the groups back, several Galleries were inaccessible as due to unique permissions the groups had not been added back automatically…

About SharePoint Holmes:
Part of my role is solving user issues. Sometimes they are so common that I have a standard response, but sometimes I need to do some sleuthing to understand and solve it.
As many of my readers are in a similar position, I thought I’d introduce SharePoint Holmes, SharePoint investigator, who will go through a few cases while working out loud.

Photo courtesy of Maryland Pride on Wikimedia.

SharePoint Holmes and the Survey Surprise

Survey-Detective_Maxwell_on_his_desk_in_the_movie_Until_DeathMost questions I receive about SharePoint surveys are permission issues (it is not extremely intuitive that you need to give all your audience Contribute permissions) and the error message that tells people you can not enter this survey twice.
But this time the issue was different.

The case

The site owner had created a survey in which each item had to be completed by two people. When the first person had entered their part, they would send the link to their entry to the second person, who was supposed to enter the rest.
However, the second person could not open the link and got an error message.
“Sorry, something went wrong. No item exists at [location]. It may have been deleted or renamed by another user”.
When that second person went to the site and opened the survey, they could see that an item had been entered but when they clicked “Show all responses” they received a message that there were no responses.
Confusion all around!

The investigation

  1. I checked the permissions, of course.
    The second person had Contribute permissions to the survey, so that was OK. Everyone could see and edit all items, which is a bit scary, but as this was a controlled process with a limited audience, that could work.
  2. People could enter multiple responses, so that was also not a limitation that could cause this issue.
  3. I checked the survey itself. It had some branching. I completed the first part of the survey and clicked Save and close. My entry was saved.
  4. I went to the survey and saw the item and could open and edit it.
  5. I looked at the 2nd part of the survey, which had many required responses and that gave me some ideas to test…

As it turns out,

  • You are unable to save a straightforward Survey item (with no branches) if it contains questions where you have to provide an answer. We know that, it is the same as with List items.

    Survey-needsmandatoryfields
    This survey can not be saved when the required fields have not been completed.
  • A survey with branching however, will save answers, even if you have not entered all mandatory fields. You will get a message and the item will be saved as “not complete”.
    Survey-setup
    With the yellow-marked question the branching occurs, and there are 2 questions which require a response after that.
    Survey-page1filled
    This is what the first part of the survey looks like. The first person would “Save and Close”.
    Survey-messageforsaving
    “This website reports the following” – you are learning Dutch as you go along 🙂
    Survey-part1saved
    When you Save and Close,  the item will be stored and be visible.

    Survey-1responsenotcompleted
    If you click on “Show all responses” you will see that the item is “not completed”.
  • People can only see the completed items of someone else. As the item is “not complete” because the second part with mandatory questions is not completed,  second person Mystery Guest can not open my item, even though she can see there is an item and she has all the permissions.
    Survey-MysteryGuestsees1item
    Mystery Guest can see there is an item added…

    Survey-NoresponsesforMysteryGuest
    …but when she clicks “Show all responses” she gets the above message.
  • When I removed the “requiredness” of the answers of the 2nd part, the survey was marked as “complete” upon saving, and then the 2nd person could open and edit the 2nd part of the survey.

The solution

I discussed my findings with the site owner and suggested to make the answers in the second part of the survey no longer mandatory. I showed him how to create views in a survey to help getting the second part completed.

That worked for him. Case closed!

New experience for Surveys!

I also saw the Survey in Modern SharePoint. I appreciate the new consistency with other lists, but I can imagine that people will be lost without that well-known look-and-feel. But then, I expect that Forms will make the Survey obsolete soon, anyway.
I wanted to share a screenshot, but things are not very stable yet and I kept getting errors and the Classic experience. As soon as I have captured it, I will share!

About SharePoint Holmes:
Part of my role is solving user issues. Sometimes they are so common that I have a standard response, but sometimes I need to do some sleuthing to understand and solve it.
As many of my readers are in a similar position, I thought I’d introduce SharePoint Holmes, SharePoint investigator, who will go through a few cases while working out loud.

Image courtesy of ZaL141TeLq on Wikimedia.

SharePoint Holmes and the Forbidden Follow

sherlock-holmes-462957_960_720.jpgThe Case

Recently someone reported an issue with Following. Whenever he wanted to follow a site or a document, he got this message:

Unable to Follow

The investigation

  1. I did a screenshare with him to find out what exactly he was doing. Sometimes seeing someone’s screen or actions provide you with a clue, but he did the correct things and there was nothing weird in his screen either.
  2. I asked my more technical colleague and he came up with something good. Do you know where Followed Sites (or Followed Documents) are stored?
    Follow a site and then click on the confirmation popup that appears.

    SH-Follow-Followsitepopup
    Click quickly on this popup before it disappears!
  3. I ended up on a page with “yourname/my.sharepoint.com/personal/”  in the URLSH-Follow-WhereFollowedSitesLiveand this is…
    SH-follow-drumroll
    drum roll

    …OneDrive!

  4. I replaced the last bit of the URL, to the right of the tenant name, with _layouts/15/viewlsts.aspx?view=14
  5. I saw the Site Contents of my OneDrive, with the Social List at the bottom.

    SH-Follow-SocialList in Site Contents
    This is where the Followed sites live – in a list called “Social” in your OneDrive.
  6. When clicking the ellipses next to the Social List and clicking Settings, I ended up in the list, which has several content types and a ton of columns.
    SH-Follow-Content Types
    The content types available in the Social list

    SH-Follow-Columns
    Pfff…all these columns just for the things you follow?
  7. I asked the user to give me Full Control to his OneDrive, as this is out of my normal support scope so I do not have admin access.
  8. I compared the  Social List of the user with my own.
    It appeared that his Social List missed two columns: File Type Prog ID and Server URL prog ID.

    SH-Follow-MissingColumns
    The highlighted columns were not in his Social list.
  9. Also, on his Delve profile, any hints of his OneDrive were missing in his profile card. I looked at the Delve profile of unknown colleagues and there is always a mention of “[person name] ‘s OneDrive” even when no files are shared.
    (I can not show that as I am the only person in my tenant)
  10. I searched on the internet and found mentions about being unable to follow sites but the problems (one user, some users, all users), causes (the application pool account has no access to the database, security updates, a setting not configured correctly) and solutions were very mixed and I could not find anything about those ProgID’s.

The solution

Well, uh…this is beyond my scope and a different team supports OneDrive, so I have assigned the incident to another team. SharePoint Holmes failed…:(
But although I have not managed to solve this,  I have spent some enjoyable time digging into new territory and learning something new.

Which issues have you found with Following Sites and how have you solved them?

About SharePoint Holmes:
Part of my role is solving user issues. Sometimes they are so common that I have a standard response, but sometimes I need to do some sleuthing to understand and solve it.
As many of my readers are in a similar position, I thought I’d introduce SharePoint Holmes, SharePoint investigator, who will go through a few cases while working out loud.

Detective image courtesy of 422737 on Pixabay
Drums image courtesy of posterize at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

SharePoint Holmes and the Missing Menu-item

SPHolmes-EditPageThe case

“I am officially the owner of the site, but I can not manage the site”, the user had written in the description field of the incident.
I asked her what exactly she was trying to do that was impossible, and she said she had wanted to make changes to the homepage of the site.

“But the menu in the gear wheel does not look like the training materials”, she said. “Please see attached screenshot”.

Now that was an interesting screenshot!

SPHolmes-EditPage-Gear wheel
“Site settings” but no “Edit page” in the menu!

I could have asked her if she was able to go to the homepage from the Site Pages or Pages library and if she would have been able to conjure up the Page tab and do it from there, but I was so intrigued by the screenshot that I decided to do some investigation. After all, the “Edit page” option needs to be there and I could better fix that once and for all than waste her time with workarounds. Her problem was not so urgent that she needed the workaround.

And to be frank, I hoped it would turn out to be another SharePoint Holmes topic 🙂

The investigation

  1. Of course, I checked the permissions first. They looked OK. (You know the Dutch words by now, right? 🙂 )

    SPHolmes-EditPage-Permissions
    Owners with Full Control, Members with Edit, Visitors and another group with Read permissions – looks normal!
  2. Yes, she was in the Owners group with Full Control.

    SPHolmes-EditPage-InOwnersGroup
    Mystery Guest is in the Owners group.
  3. I checked the items with unique permissions. The Site Pages library was one of them.
  4. Aha, the Site Pages library had very limited permissions – only Visitors had Read access and that was it. As the Visitors group contained a company-wide AD group, I knew she had access – but only with Read permissions.

    SPHolmes-EditPage-SitePagesPermissions
    Fortunately a wide audience could see the site’s pages – but nobody could edit them!
  5. I checked the Homepage permissions to be on the safe side, and that inherited permissions from the library. So she could see the homepage but not edit it.

The solution

I added the Owners group back to the Site Pages library with the proper permissions. I informed the Site Owner that she had removed the permissions of everyone except the Visitors.
She informed me that “Edit Page” was now in her Gear Wheel menu and she could edit the page again. Problem solved!
I suggested to think about what she wanted to do with this library – keep it like it was with only Owner and Visitor groups (to avoid unwanted edits) or to inherit the permissions from the site.

I wish I had something more deep and interesting to conclude than: “SharePoint permissions are difficult to understand and manage”. 😦

But if you ever come across a screenshot like that, you know what to do!

About SharePoint Holmes:
Part of my role is solving user issues. Sometimes they are so common that I have a standard response, but sometimes I need to do some sleuthing to understand and solve it.
As many of my readers are in a similar position, I thought I’d introduce SharePoint Holmes, SharePoint investigator, who will go through a few cases while working out loud.

Image courtesy of  Clker-Free-Vector-Images on Pixabay.

SharePoint Holmes and the Continuous Classic View

Sherlock GnomesThe case

“Why can I not set my document library to the New experience?” the user asked me.

“Of course you can, let me show you”, I said confidently.
Over-confidently, as it turned out. Because there was no “Exit Classic View” link bottom left.

Classic-Nolinkbottomleft
Huh? No “Exit Classic View” bottom left of the page.

 

And the Advanced Library Settings showed that the library was already set to display in New experience.

Classic-LibrarySettings
The library was set to display in the New experience

Sigh…I got my SharePoint Holmes hat and magnifying glass out of the cupboard and set out towards…

The investigation

  1. I remembered some other sites which did not display their “Exit Classic View” button. Those all have a banner on top of the page,  a popular feature from our old intranet, that has been migrated to the new intranet.
    I set the user’s page into Edit mode. There was a web part zone on top but there was no web part in it, so that did not give me any clues. Hmmm.

    Classic-Nowebpartontop
    Empty web part zone!
  2. I looked at the other views in the library and those were in New Experience. Huh!
  3. I created a new view and this was in New Experience as well, so the issue was with the default view.
  4. To check my sanity, I did some searching (Yes, I know I should do that straight away but I like to look at things and push buttons 🙂 ) and what did I find?  This.
  5. So, I dove into that Classic View, edited the page, looked at Closed Web Parts…and found a Content Editor Web Part.

    Classic-ClosedWebpart
    There was a closed web part on the page.
  6. I added it to the page, then deleted it and that turned out to be…

The solution

Classic-AfterRemoval
The library now shows in New experience, with the “switch”-link bottom left.

So, there are two options when you can not get your document library to show in New Experience while it is set to be New:

  1. Remove all web parts on the view page, open and closed.
    Set the page to Edit mode.
    If you see a web part, DELETE it.
    If you do not see a web part, click Insert > Tab > Web Parts > Closed Web Parts. If you see one or more web parts mentioned, add part(s) to page, and then DELETE it/them.
  2. Create a new view by copying the old view with a new name, setting it to be the default view if needed, and deleting the old view.
    I must admit this did not work in my own tenant – all views showed and were created in Classic SharePoint. But I have seen this multiple times in our work tenant.

If you want to display a picture, you could also upload one or more pictures and pin it/them to the top.

Microsoft also has some things to say about the Classic vs Modern view. They also mention the influence of web parts (at the end of the article) but the language is not very clear.

About SharePoint Holmes:
Part of my role is solving user issues. Sometimes they are so common that I have a standard response, but sometimes I need to do some sleuthing to understand and solve it.
As many of my readers are in a similar position, I thought I’d introduce SharePoint Holmes, SharePoint investigator, who will go through a few cases while working out loud.

Picture from unknown source but it was too funny to let go. See the trailer of Sherlock Gnomes! With Johnny Depp…