Meeting Actions in a Team Site

Actions-FeaturedSome time ago I was contacted by an employee from one of our locations.

What was the problem:

The department she worked for had a lot of meetings, and everyone was a bit confused about the actions and decisions that resulted from those meetings. All meetings had different attendees, and meeting information was properly documented and accessible for all, but in various files and in various locations.

This resulted in the following issues:

  • People had no central overview of all tasks assigned to them at the meetings
  • People forgot where the documents were, because they could be in different places
  • Meeting owners had no way to check progress between meetings
  • The workload was not evenly distributed – some people had too many action points and could never finish them all on time, while others had almost none.
  • People were sometimes given conflicting tasks in different meetings (such as:  “we need to keep more stock so we can work around inconsistent raw material deliveries”/ “we need to reduce stock because it costs money”) and because there was no central overview, it was difficult to recognize those.
  • It was not always clear which decisions had been made, by whom and when.

What was the solution?

Well, their team site, of course! 🙂
They wanted to have all the action points in one central place. They thought of an Excel file, but reckoned that that could create issues with concurrent editing, and in fact their first question was if they could do something to avoid that.

Of course I showed them that it might be much easier to use a list.

I started with a Task list, because they liked the idea of an email notification.
I added a few columns, such as “Meeting Name” and “Topic” for  classification.
I created some extra  views: “Open Action Points” grouped by meeting, and a view grouped “By Topic”.

Entering a new action
This is the form to capture Actions from the meeting.
All open actions
All Open Actions – this is the View used during meetings.

This setup was easy to understand and work with for everyone and was implemented in no time. The only reason that they had not done this earlier was because they did not know it could be done this way!

The Decisions List was a separate custom list with similar “Meeting Name” and “Topic”fields.

What were the results?

  • Time savings because all actions and decisions are in one easy-to-find place
  • Consistent progress management of action items and decisions
  • Faster turnaround of action items because everyone knows the list and the process
  • Better distribution of tasks over all meeting attendees
  • Insight in and avoidance of conflicting assignments
  • Insight in decisions taken
  • 3 other departments that want a similar setup (I have already created the list as a template)
  • The project was featured in the local employee newsletter (mentioning me as well :-))

Yes, this is simple standard SharePoint and technically not very challenging. However, this very simple solution has made a real difference to that department and to the company. So I think it is worth mentioning!

While I was recreating this list in my own Office365 environment I noticed the Timeline bar. I do not remember seeing this before so I am curious what it does. Another thing to investigate!

Timeline
The Timeline in the Task List. This is available on every view.

Image courtesy of adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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