7 ways to create and foster unique permissions in your SharePoint site

SnowflakeUniquePermissionsSome people call me “obsessed” with SharePoint permissions, and especially with breaking permission inheritance from the parent.

They are correct and I’ve got good reason (or so I think): the majority of issues and support questions have to do with non-standard permissions and people not fully understanding the consequences of creating unique permissions that they or their predecessors have done, knowingly or accidentally.

So while pondering my personal branding 🙂 I thought it might be better to embrace the options that Microsoft has created for us to share freely. After all, this thing is not called SharePoint for nothing! In Office365 everything is geared towards sharing content, without any considerations or warnings that many of these options create unique permissions, so who am I to worry, or go against that principle?

And what’s more, people who create unique permissions keep me in work! There’s nothing I like better than a complicated permissions puzzle, so if I want to stay away from boring discussions about columns that do not align 100% or the exact dimensions or rotation speed of carousels, why not make sure that I create some interesting work for myself?

So, let us make sure we all share content freely and without abandon!

In order to do that, I have collected these 7 principles for site owners.

1. Never give anyone “Read” access

This restricts the options for these people to share content. You will give them ugly words to share with (“Restricted Link”…ugh!),  and they will need your approval. Come on, these are grown ups that know what they are doing! If they want to share a document, they must have a good reason. And you, as a site owner, have better things to do than approve or decline sharing requests.
Treat everyone the same and give them Contribute permissions at the very least. Who knows, they may have some great insights to add to your policy or project statement. Added April 27, 2017: And they may even help you design your homepage and other pages! Thank you for that addition, Helena! (See comments below)

2. Always use individual permissions

Well, you know there is this site group option of Owners, Members and Visitors, but who wants to be in a group, if the only thing joining you is having an interest in a document? Why bother puzzling out which group would be the best option for a person? You know it never fits 100% – this document is interesting to Stella, Eric and Tom, while the other document is interesting to Stella, Tom and Cindy. How can you make groups if every document has their own audience?
Surely your audience consist of all individuals, with individual needs. Using individual permissions will give you the most freedom to match each document with the people who really need it.

3. Break permissions inheritance freely

When in doubt, break! Or when your boss tells you so, of course. SharePoint has the option to allow access on a granular level, so why not make use of it and enjoy this to the fullest? You can pinpoint any document library, folder or even document or list item and give exactly the right individuals access.

4. Never use the “restricted link” option

Restricted…what an ugly word, it feels so….limited! Why would you want to impose restrictions? When you want to share content, select the “Can read” link to make sure that your intended audience can read it and not bother you with requests for access. Even better, use the “Can Edit” option. After all, your audience may have great ideas to share in that document. Policies and other controlled documents are a thing of the past, let’s crowdsource them all!

5. Immediately accept any Access Request

Hit the “Accept”  button and do it quickly, or you may lose a perfectly good reader or editor of the page or document you are sharing. Be ashamed of yourself that you have excluded someone from your content! Rejoice that they go to so much trouble to see it!
Only then, but only if you have the time, find out why and to which content this person wanted access.

6. Never review your permissions

You may be tempted to add Caroline, John and Marcia into a group if you see their name appear on every document, but who are you to decide they need to be grouped? As mentioned in paragraph 2, they are all unique individuals and throwing them into a group only because they read or edit the same documents does not do justice to their uniqueness. And the excuse of “groups are easier to manage for me” is a bit selfish, don’t you think?

7. Stop managing permissions altogether

This may be the best advice anyone can give you.
After all, is it not a bit conceited to say that “you own this content” or “you are managing this site”? The other people in the site know very well what they are doing, and they will take care of ensuring that this content is available to all the right people! Together you know who needs, or is interested in, your information. Over time, your content will gravitate towards exactly the correct audience.

To make sure that your unique permissions grow fast enough, you may want to enter in a competition with other site owners. It may well be that companies like ShareGate have a tool that can measure unique permissions. If they don’t, I suggest they develop one quickly.
Let me know how it goes!

Image courtesy of digitalart at FreeDigitalPhotos.net 

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “7 ways to create and foster unique permissions in your SharePoint site

  1. Helena Sändare April 26, 2017 / 3:04 pm

    Bwahahahaha Ellen, I love this post! ❤
    Under principle No.1, you could add that in O365, the "Contribute" folks can actually also help you design your pages, adding webparts and stuff!

  2. Christine Green April 26, 2017 / 7:47 pm

    SharePoint permissions are the bane of my existence. Thanks for the laugh! I have no fear you will run out of work any time soon.

    • Ellen van Aken April 27, 2017 / 10:51 am

      Thanks, Christine and glad this made you laugh. From now on, I consider permissions to be a blessing 😄

  3. Jonathan Gadbois May 25, 2017 / 12:18 am

    Love it. I work in this space and the headaches I have seen. Gave me a chuckle to see that I am not alone in the universe.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s