No company pain, no SharePoint gain

Pain-ManThe conference audience sniggered when I showed a slide with that title a few years ago. It was one of the lessons learned from doing SharePoint configuration projects. I sincerely believe that SharePoint adoption will be easier if your business is suffering.

Here is how:

1. SharePoint can help manage a portfolio of projects that boost performance.
Companies that are underperforming often introduce company-wide projects to analyze processes and find ideas on how to increase top- and bottom-line growth. Managing the programme of those projects can easily be facilitated with SharePoint. I have done that before.

Collction of Tam Sites to manage an improvement programme
Portfolio management can be done easily with a collection of Team Sites, one for each project or topic.


2. SharePoint can facilitate processes.

Every company may be losing money because processes are not optimized. Rich companies may have the budget to buy the best possible tool for every process (they have to be careful not to end up with a quilt of different solutions, of course). But if you do not have that money, and you have SharePoint you can use SharePoint to facilitate those processes.
Remember, SharePoint can generally provide you with at least 80% of your requirements. That is not too bad, is it?
An example is CRM in a Team Site – a system to collect and process customer complaints. In an improvement project, it was found that the company spent large amounts of money on reimbursing customers who complained. It turned out that there was no consistent process to manage complaints. A project was started to map and redesign the process.  The idea was to use SAP, but due to timing and budget restrictions it was decided to use SharePoint as an intermediate solution.
After introduction of the new site and process, the company was able to save millions of dollars by no longer reimbursing every customer regardless. Issues could now be investigated and responsibility assigned. And by keeping track of all complaints in one database they could analyze where internal processes could be improved.

3. SharePoint solutions can easily be re-used.
When budgets are low, companies can drive re-use of existing solutions instead of allowing different business to create their own solutions.
If you have a process facilitated by SharePoint, and you want to re-use it for a different business or team you can generally make a template out of the list, library or site as a starting point for the other business. (You may want to read my 10 Tips for Choice and Lookup Columns because columns behave differently when templated)
The concept of CRM in a Team Site has been re-used for various other processes in different countries, as well as Telesales and Software Reductions.

4. Everyone will learn what SharePoint really looks and works like.
I know it is fashionable to say that SharePoint looks ugly. But I am always scared when I hear intranet managers boast that “our intranet does not look like SharePoint at all”. It means they will not able to use standard training and support, and when they migrate to a new version all those custom changes will likely not migrate well, and they will be depending on 3rd party support and their costs for eternity. (Trust me, I’ve been there)
If your company is on a budget, you will not have money to hire consultants to do “fancy design”.  But then, why should you? With some standard things you can make your site very presentable. Remember, this is an internal tool that should make people’s work easier.  It should be easy to work with first and foremost.

So, if your company is in pain, SharePoint will be used more often and more in its default shape, than if you have plenty of budget for everything. In my opinion that is a good thing. It will allow users to become familiar with SharePoint more quickly because they will encounter it in its native state more frequently. The menus and buttons will always be in the same place. Lists, libraries and will work the same way across the company. It will mean a consistent user interface and show employees that SharePoint can be used for many purposes. You know what? It feels strange talking about “SharePoint” when my last post was so much about not using the word SharePoint anymore.

Perhaps the start of 2015 will be a good time to start using “Office365” more often.

But before that, I wish all my readers a merry Christmas and a wonderful, happy and successful 2015!

Image courtesy of imagerymajestic at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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